Adolf Hitler

Adolf Hitler

furor

The vulgar-looking and ornate capital letter in Figure 68 has a vertical line added in unnecessarily between the left and right parts. Obviously, this writer displays an undue claim of self-importance. Adolf Hitler wrote this way. (Many graphologists believe that the vertical line represented his moustache.)

h1

In the above images, we can observe many peculiar aspects.

1. The slant. By measuring figure 3A with a protractor, you will notice that the capital H measures 28 degrees of incline; at the end of his name, the incline has become an acute 14 degrees. (Any slant measuring under 55 degrees must be considered pathological.) Not only does Hitler’s writing start out pathologically, it becomes more so as it continues. His last letter is almost horizontal. Considering that slant indicates the degree of approach to others, we see here an intense need of some kind or desperate grab toward his fellowman. The fact that the writing looks as if it were falling shows acute depression.

2. Pressure. The extreme pressure in both specimens indicates a powerful, physical dynamo of energy when dealing with his fellowman.

3. t bars. In Figure 3B, we see a thick, heavy, brutal-looking t bar, written in a downward direction. This t bar shows us how Der Fuhrer approaches the addressee. Hitler’s down-flung t bar, written with heavy pressure (even without his acutely inclined writing) leaves us in no doubt how he could become the monster that he was. These down-flung t-bars indicate the writer’s low opinion of others. It wasn’t difficult for Hitler to do away with others.

4. Capital letters. The name is the ego, and any capital letter also indicates the writer’s ego state. Consequently, the capital letter of the name has an especially important meaning in interpreting the writer’s ego.
Look at both 3A and 3B. The name is already written with a thick hand. Then Hitler adds something quite unnecessary to the capital in his surname – a vertical bar. This ugly, vulgar-looking, heavy, down-flung line, a tasteless ornamentation to an already ugly character, proclaims a deformed and depraved ego. If the world had recognized this depravity in his writing before his rise to power, would it have made any difference? One wonders.